Above The Cloud

In the six-years that I’ve been heading outdoors on a regular basis, I’ve yet to experience what’s known as a true cloud inversion, where you find yourself (often situated on a high point) stationed above the level of cloud; masking the landscape beneath it.

I imagine this is easier to experience in mountain environments, given the greater elevation above sea level. But, where I live in North Somerset, there aren’t many mountains and so, without being a meteorologist, I wouldn’t known when or where to search for this experience while staying close to home.

My closest high point to home is Beacon Batch; the highest point in the range of the Mendip Hills and only 325 metres above sea level. An unlikely spot from which to find yourself above the clouds, right?

It was on a walk last month that began in the village of Blagdon – only a stone’s throw from Beacon Batch and Black Down – that I was able to witness the unexpected settling of mist over the local lake.

This may not qualify as an actual cloud inversion but, for a cold Saturday morning, this was a spectacle that I could appreciate.

Twenty-four hours after this, I would experience an even greater representation of the effect I wasn’t quite able to capture, here.

I’m saving that for another post, along with an up-and-coming look at how much of Blagdon Lake you can legally walked around.

Thanks for reading.

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One thought on “Above The Cloud

  1. jcombe

    I’ve had a few conditions a bit like that early in the morning, but I’ve yet to experience a true cloud inversion (where you see an entire blanket of cloud beaneath you, rather than just a small amount in a valley). Though it is certainly something I’d like to experience.

    Liked by 1 person

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